First Act™ Discovery Drum Kit Teardown! ⏺⚫🔴🔵🔵🔘

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If you are reading this, then you have a First Act Discovery Drum-pad!

=====================  You have had this drum pad for a while now, and you love it. The sounds are so retro; it’s an engaging and low-stakes device to carry in public.

You appreciate the extensive rhythm selection, the immersive sampling modes, and the dynamic mode selections,

but something is wrong with this device…

SOME CONTROLS AREN’T RESPONSIVE, AND THE RIGHT SPEAKER IS COMPLETELY MISSING!

Before opening the drum pad, it is important to know that “this device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules.2 a.jpg

According to the second clause, “this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.” ============================================================== That means us.

OUR RECOMMENDED TOOLKIT:2-b.jpgPhillips Head Screwdriver (no larger than PH2)dsc8530-b-1-e1505671543427.jpgA Soldering Iron, Iron Rest, and Sponge or Steel Wool for cleaning Iron Tip2-b1.jpgOPTIONAL Gloves provide extra grip for small screws that would otherwise place strain on your fingertips.

0 : BACK

3.jpgFlip over your drum pad and locate the screw I have highlighted for you in blue.

1 : FIRST

4.jpgWe will open this compartment to check for batteries.

3 : ONCE OPENED

5.jpgPlease remove any batteries to avoid electrical shock during deconstruction.

4 : HALVING

6.jpgNow unscrew each of the 12 total screws that hold the bottom half of the drum pad to the top half.

5 : GRIP

7.jpgMake sure your screwdriver is locked into the screw head firmly to avoid any strain on your hand and potential loss of grip.

6 : TAKE YOUR TIME

actual comparison.jpgTake your time with fussy screws to avoid stripping.

7 : HALVED

 

_DSC8524_edited.jpgOpening the device, we see the circuit board is attached to the battery compartment by 5 wires.

8 : FLIP

dsc8531.jpgTo disconnect the top half from the bottom half, melt each of the five contact points with a soldering iron. For ease of access, flip the drum pad so that the top half faces up. Use the handle piece that you obtained during the unscrewing process to hold the top half up from the bottom half.

9 : WITH ONE HAND

_DSC8533 copy.jpgHold the iron’s tip steadily up to the contact point while pulling back on the wire. Within seconds of the iron tip actually touching the contact point, the wire will become free.

11 : SEPARATION

soldering-speaker-cones.jpgUse the soldering iron to free up the contact points on the speakers, separating the top half of the drum pad from the bottom half.

12 : 3” SPEAKER REPAIR

_DSC8538.JPGAt this point you could remove or replace the 3” speaker cones

13 : DISCONNECT SENSORS

dsc8539.jpg

The top half of the drum pad contains impact sensors for each individual pad, as well as all the circuitry and control interface.

14 : BOARD FREE

dsc8552.jpgUse the soldering iron to disconnect all contact points between the circuit board and the impact sensors, so that we can lift the circuit board access the control interface.

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15 : CIRCUIT BOARD

dsc8558_li.jpgWith all impact sensors disconnected we can unscrew the circuit board from the top-half.

16 : ON BOARD CONTROLS

dsc8561.jpgThe circuit board contains 20 rubber buttons15 LEDs, and 2 sliders to interface with the plastic controls.

17 : MECHANICAL CONTROLS

_DSC8564.JPGWe can access the control panel and replace our missing plastic buttons!

18 : FINAL PARTS

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X : PARTS LIST

4 : DOUBLE A BATTERIES

7 : METAL TYPE A PHILLIPS SCREWS – 2 CM DEPTH

14 : METAL TYPE B PHILLIPS SCREWS – 3.5 CM DEPTH

4 : METAL TYPE C PHILLIPS SCREWS – 1 CM DEPTH

2 : RUBBER & MAGNETIC SPEAKER CONES – 3 INCH

4 : RUBBER & PLASTIC IMPACT SENSORS – 1.5 INCH

2 : RUBBER & PLASTIC  IMPACT SENSORS – 2 INCH

2 : RUBBER & PLASTIC IMPACT SENSORS – 3.5 INCH

1 : FIBERGLASS, COPPER, & SILICON MAIN CIRCUIT BOARD

14 : RUBBER BUTTONS

24 : PLASTIC BUTTONS – 1 CM LENGTH

2 : PLASTIC BUTTONS – .5 CM LENGTH

2 : PLASTIC SLIDERS

XX : PROCESSES

_DSC8570.JPGThe Type A plastic button was made via injection-moulding to ensure quick and cheap manufacturing, while creating a component which can sustain use. The nib at the bottom of the button implies that the button was molded along a sprue with many other, perhaps identical, parts. The dip which covers the upward face is a simple yet effective technique for providing a tactile language for the user to reference, as well as adding an accessibility function for younger or disabled users.

_DSC8571.JPGThe rubber piece which rests under the Type A plastic button serves as the medium through which user input travels. When the plastic button is depressed, the raised surface at the top of the rubber piece comes in contact with the silicon conductor on the chip board. The rubber material provides ample compression for the chip board, lowering the risk of damage regardless of the user’s pressure on the plastic button.

_DSC8510.jpgThe control panel is a solid plastic rectangle featuring linear divots to separate rows of applied text, as well as to create groupings of controls. The panel has many uniquely shaped holes to fit various plastic buttons and sliders.