Slinky Slink!

I am posting this video on how to make an oragami slinky for a few reasons.

  1. I think it’s awesome to make kinetic sculptures, especially with so few materials as just paper.
  2. The video is clean and straightforward. The camera is mounted and doesn’t move, the background is white and simple, there is no music and no words.
  3. The video is the right length, not rushed, but under 5 minutes.
  4. Most importantly: The video is exceptionally clear. It has words describing what to do as well as graphic images of the instructions.

Enjoy!

Change a Tube/ Speak Pittsburghese/ Don’t Mix Milk With RedBull

Hi all. I decided to post a serious tutorial followed by a couple of sillier ones. The first is how to change a bike tube when you get a flat. I appreciate this video, because it tells you what to do and also what to be careful of. For instance, remembering to unhook your break calipers when taking the tire/rim off of the fork. Learning how to change tubes is really convenient and it can save you lots of money (because bike shops charge for labor and for parts).

Ok, so now for the sillier ones… This is a guide about the things that Pittsburghers say. Sometimes you will actually hear people say Yinz and Redd Up. So I think its useful…Right? Right?

Finally, Don’t mix milk with RedBull… The song is a nice touch.

How to make a reversible Tote Bag

I decided to post this bag tutorial because I’ve always wanted to learn how to make bags and because this one makes it seem really uncomplicated and fairly easy to do (if I knew how to sow!). I like that it broke it up in parts – straps, the body, and lining and had pictures to accompany each step. I also liked that it numbered the pictures and had steps written with corresponding numbers. I also liked that it had links to make similar or matching products at the end of the tutorial.

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Finished!

tote

Tutorial Research – Paper Ribbon Flag Tutorial

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I really enjoy this tutorial on how to make paper ribbon flags. I think the photography is very clear and instead of just listing the steps and showing photos of the process separately, the written steps are explained on the photos making it very easy to follow. I also appreciate the fact that the author tells the audience what they can use the final product for. It teaches those that may not be able to visualize this item, beyond sitting in that clear jar, real examples that they can incorporate into their own lives. I also think the use of color is smart in the post. She chooses a background that is neutral to allow the blue paper to pop.

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Always Be Knolling

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-CTkbHnpNQ

I posted this as a “tutorial” in the broadest sense of the word, but more so because I really like the style that it is shot in. It goes to show that you can make an engaging video with a static camera position and a catch tune, even if your subject matter is rather banal.

Also, I think the work of Tom Sachs very much relates to the Making Studio class, and I encourage anyone who is not familiar with his stuff to check it out.

I posted this as a “tutorial” in the broadest sense of the word, but more so because I really like the style that it is shot in. It goes to show that you can make an engaging video with a static camera position and a catchy tune, even if your subject matter is rather banal.

Also, I think the work of Tom Sachs very much relates to the Making Studio class and I am a big fan, I encourage anyone who is not familiar with his stuff to check it out here.

Tutorial 1: Charging an iPod with a lemon. [Posted by Richard]

This was a tutorial / education video that helped me out a lot in the first project. Although not the most high quality or aesthetically well presented video it does give very clear demonstrations and back up reasoning and justifications. This backup evidence is something I find really helpful and informative and is something I would like to take through into my own tutorial.