Edible Arduino Mousetrap

Hey Guys,

Sooo, I think I’m going to incorporate morse code into my project and an scan of the world wide web firstly gave me this;

but then also this slightly more informative tutorial.

This is SOS;

int pin = 13;

void setup()
{
pinMode(pin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{
dot(); dot(); dot();
dash(); dash(); dash();
dot(); dot(); dot();
delay(3000);
}

void dot()
{
digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
delay(250);
digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
delay(250);
}

void dash()
{
digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
delay(1000);
digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
delay(250);
}

Cool right? I didn’t know you could type it in as dot and dash.

You can check out the full tutorial here.

People are also very wierd.

Have a great night!

Arduino projects for next class

Please research tutorials on sites like Instructables, Make: Projects, the Adafruit Learning System, and elsewhere for projects similar to what you’re trying to achieve. Post up one (or more if you like– separate posts) Arduino projects here on the blog that helped you or might help your classmates (do this by the end of Friday). Your project post is due by 10:30pm on Monday night (no exceptions or extensions– try to get it up 24 hrs before the deadline in case you run into any issues). Bring your physical project to class.

I’ll come to SVA on Saturday at 12pm to do some more Arduino workshopping with you guys, so show up if you want help or more parts (I’ll bring an assortment of basics). Browse the Adafruit catalog in your project research, and if you spot any specific parts you’d like, let me know and I can get them for you at a discount (and without shipping charges) and bring them with me (final cutoff to request parts Friday 12pm).

Hi Everyone,

I am Cassandra aka Ca$$andra aks Cassy aka Cass. You can call me any of these names. Here I am hanging out on a rooftop in Park Slope:

Image

 

So about me: I grew up in El Paso, Texas or as we locals like to call it El Chuco. It is a border town and one of the safest cites in the US. It is on the border with Juarez, Mexico which is one of the most dangerous cities in the world (think No Country for Old Men). I am Mexican American. Here I am as a kid:

Image

I studied filmmaking in my undergrad education. After graduation I worked as a documentary video editor at a small studio in Berkeley. I then started working at a consulting firm–Bassett & Partners. We specialize in ethnographic research and design/brand strategy. Ingrid’s job at IDEO is similar to what I did/do except we did not do prototyping. After years of working with/for many talented designers I decided that design school was for me!

If you want to know a little bit about some of the projects I have worked on (work and personal) you can check out the portfolio section on the website I made for my application to this program here.

I am really looking forward to this class and working with all of you! Here I am in Berlin at the Hamburger Bahnhof aka Museum für Gegenwart. The exhibit was ryoji ikeda’s db (decibel).

Image

The Junkmail Flashlight

Hi all,

Hopefully you’ve noticed, by now, my previous post linking to the Junkmail Flashlight.  Clicking will not give you any email viruses or e-worms, not to worry.  Click and you will be taken to an oversize video, to be projected in class.

Having a bit more experience making three-dimensional works, I felt it would be a decent use of my time experimenting with the creation of an experience.  How effective this experience is, particularly of the flashlight aspect, may depend on the projection during tomorrow’s class.

I have taken the notion of junk mail as, essentially, spam.  Junk mail via email, rather than good old-fashioned snail mail.  I hope to share a bit of how I feel receiving junk mail, though in a slightly more overwhelming manner.

While I am a’ bloggin, let me take a moment to introduce some of my past work at www.dthonis.com

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Turn the lights down low, get awfully close to your computer screen and double-click for the Junkmail Flashlight.

I hope you’ve enjoyed my spamming efforts.

-David

Durable Animated GIF.

For my “Durable Animated GIF” I first began to think about what it actually means to be “durable”.

I then began to create some rough storyboards on what the concept of my GIF would be to illustrate this adjective effectively.

I decided on myself to be the subject of “durable”. Humans seem pretty resilient & I happen to be one, so I guess I’m pretty durable. “Long-lasting” was a synonym that came up, so I wanted the animation to be a constant cycle in which the last frame transitions to the first frame well in a repetitive sequence. People seem to enjoy watching other people getting punched or kicked over & over again as well (ie America’s Funniest Home Videos & the crazy guy below).

The source file of the GIF I created is copied to 3 of my personal computers, on 4 external drives (3 thumb drives & 1 external hard drive), uploaded to 2 cloud storage servers & attempting to upload it to Amazon Glacier (their super archival secure cloud storage service). The image below shows the final GIF playing in the VFL on the Panasonic Toughbook.

& here’s the final Durable Animated GIF.

Thanks to Richard for being gentle.

Damon

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS STARE REAL HARD DOUBLE CLICK JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS!  STARE REAL HARD!  DOUBLE-CLICK!  JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT!

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS!  STARE REAL HARD!  DOUBLE-CLICK!  JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT!

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS!  STARE REAL HARD!  DOUBLE-CLICK!  JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT!

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS!  STARE REAL HARD!  DOUBLE-CLICK!  JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT!

(You could be a winner!)

TURN OUT THE LIGHTS!  STARE REAL HARD!  DOUBLE-CLICK!  JUNKMAIL FLASHLIGHT!

Upcycled Teapot

I had the pleasure of creating an upcycled teapot during this past week. This means that the teapot is to be created from other things. Early on I wanted to work with either metal or marble, and after showing up to school with an inch thick steel pipe I chose to downgrade the heaviness. Instead I wanted to create a teapot from only one other thing. My choice fell onto an aluminum coffee bean container. The former lid of the coffe packaging became the handle of my teapot, and instead the user can place his or her saucer as a lid. That means that you can heat the milk of your tea at the same time as you heating your water.

     

Magnetic Water Carrier

These rambunctious neighborhood kids during a heat wave on a summer day were the inspiration for the fire hydrant extension.  One of my favorite things about living in Brooklyn is the gathering around the fire hydrant to stay cool.

Supplies were investigated and gathered from hardware stores and summer clearance.

I decided to use a low-fi way of crafting to celebrate the ideas of play and fun this design embodies.

The extension has a magnetic attachment which holds to the cast iron of the fire hydrant.  Most fire hydrant water isn’t potable so the magnets have a dual purpose of filtering the water. One can easily fill up a bottle to stay hydrated on those hot summer days.

Play can be diverted to the side walk, helping children stay safe from traffic.

Different nozzles on the hoses create different jets and streams of water.

Everyone enjoys cooling off!

DIY Light-up Blow-out Party Favor

The project dictated that I make an electric party favor. I chose to make a tutorial video describing the process by which one can take ordinary inexpensive party favors and “light them up”.

Initially I was very ambitious, thinking of ways to make a breath-sensitive switch to activate the light, or how to make a strip of lights along the blowout, but in the end I chose to make something that could be more readily replicable at home. Also, it was very important to me that what I made, being electrical, be fully functioning and I was not confident in the feasibility of my earlier ideas.

The instructional video I made is lengthy but comprehensive, as if it were made for someone with no real experience with circuitry. I hope that it’s length and thoroughness isn’t too much of a deterrent for it to be useful.

Here is an establishing shot of the supplies and a picture of the circuit concealed under the face.