Princess Anastasia Halloween Costume

My Princess Anastasia costume is inspired by Disney’s 1997 rendition of the tale of the lost Princess Anastasia of the Romanov Dynasty. During this film, there is a scene where the Princess and her companions are trying to arrange for the Princess to meet with the Dowager Queen to reveal the true identity of the missing Princess. This scene is the climax of the movie, as it sets into motion the falling action of the tale, which results in the Princess and the Dowager Queen being reunited after being separated for so many years.

This movie is one of my favorite childhood memories, and so I have decided to attempt to live out one of my childhood dreams by being Princess Anastasia (from this scene) complete with a LED and crystal tiara, white opera gloves, and a scepter (which the Princess is never actually pictured with, but I could not resist!).

Making the LED tiara, I learned that soldering small sequin LEDs into a tiara is much more difficult than it seems. Though my circuit is very straight forward, the small space in which I needed to solder all of the wires accurately, to not create a short circuit, was quite the challenge. I learned how to test for short circuits using a micrometer and got tons of practice soldering, which I found quite relaxing, and rewarding once the short circuits were rectified. Next time I make a LED tiara, I will choose to make a bigger one for the sake of soldering circuits!

Final Photo

Inspiration Photos/Links

Image result for anastasia 1997 dress"
Image result for anastasia 1997 dress"
Image result for anastasia 1997 tiara"

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118617/

Materials and Tools

Materials used for the LED Tiara include: solid wire, Neopixel individual LEDs, solder, soldering iron, hot glue, Arduino Gemma, Lithium Ion battery (5V), hair pins, and black girl magic.

In-Progress Photos

Soldered to Arduino Gemma and lithium ion battery instead of the featured coin cell battery.

Code

#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h> 

#define LED_PIN 1
 
#define LED_COUNT 4
 
#define BRIGHTNESS 50
 
Adafruit_NeoPixel strip(LED_COUNT, LED_PIN, NEO_GRB + NEO_KHZ800);
// Argument 1 = Number of pixels in NeoPixel strip
// Argument 2 = Arduino pin number (most are valid)
// Argument 3 = Pixel type flags, add together as needed:
//   NEO_KHZ800  800 KHz bitstream (most NeoPixel products w/WS2812 LEDs)
//   NEO_KHZ400  400 KHz (classic 'v1' (not v2) FLORA pixels, WS2811 drivers)
//   NEO_GRB     Pixels are wired for GRB bitstream (most NeoPixel products)
//   NEO_RGB     Pixels are wired for RGB bitstream (v1 FLORA pixels, not v2)
//   NEO_RGBW    Pixels are wired for RGBW bitstream (NeoPixel RGBW products)

void setup() {
  
#if defined(__AVR_ATtiny85__) && (F_CPU == 16000000)
  clock_prescale_set(clock_div_1);
#endif

  strip.begin();           // INITIALIZE NeoPixel strip object (REQUIRED)
  strip.show();            // Turn OFF all pixels ASAP
  strip.setBrightness(50); // Set BRIGHTNESS to about 1/5 (max = 255)
}



void loop() {
  // Fill along the length of the strip in various colors...
  colorWipe(strip.Color(255,   0,   0), 50); // Red
  colorWipe(strip.Color(  0, 255,   0), 50); // Green
  colorWipe(strip.Color(  0,   0, 255), 50); // Blue

  // Do a theater marquee effect in various colors...
  theaterChase(strip.Color(127, 127, 127), 50); // White, half brightness
  theaterChase(strip.Color(127,   0,   0), 50); // Red, half brightness
  theaterChase(strip.Color(  0,   0, 127), 50); // Blue, half brightness

  rainbow(10);             // Flowing rainbow cycle along the whole strip
  theaterChaseRainbow(50); // Rainbow-enhanced theaterChase variant
}




void colorWipe(uint32_t color, int wait) {
  for(int i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) { // For each pixel in strip...
    strip.setPixelColor(i, color);         //  Set pixel's color (in RAM)
    strip.show();                          //  Update strip to match
    delay(wait);                           //  Pause for a moment
  }
}

// Theater-marquee-style chasing lights. Pass in a color (32-bit value,
// a la strip.Color(r,g,b) as mentioned above), and a delay time (in ms)
// between frames.
void theaterChase(uint32_t color, int wait) {
  for(int a=0; a<10; a++) {  // Repeat 10 times...
    for(int b=0; b<3; b++) { //  'b' counts from 0 to 2...
      strip.clear();         //   Set all pixels in RAM to 0 (off)
      // 'c' counts up from 'b' to end of strip in steps of 3...
      for(int c=b; c<strip.numPixels(); c += 3) {
        strip.setPixelColor(c, color); // Set pixel 'c' to value 'color'
      }
      strip.show(); // Update strip with new contents
      delay(wait);  // Pause for a moment
    }
  }
}

// Rainbow cycle along whole strip. Pass delay time (in ms) between frames.
void rainbow(int wait) {
  // Hue of first pixel runs 5 complete loops through the color wheel.
  // Color wheel has a range of 65536 but it's OK if we roll over, so
  // just count from 0 to 5*65536. Adding 256 to firstPixelHue each time
  // means we'll make 5*65536/256 = 1280 passes through this outer loop:
  for(long firstPixelHue = 0; firstPixelHue < 5*65536; firstPixelHue += 256) {
    for(int i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) { // For each pixel in strip...
      // Offset pixel hue by an amount to make one full revolution of the
      // color wheel (range of 65536) along the length of the strip
      // (strip.numPixels() steps):
      int pixelHue = firstPixelHue + (i * 65536L / strip.numPixels());
      // strip.ColorHSV() can take 1 or 3 arguments: a hue (0 to 65535) or
      // optionally add saturation and value (brightness) (each 0 to 255).
      // Here we're using just the single-argument hue variant. The result
      // is passed through strip.gamma32() to provide 'truer' colors
      // before assigning to each pixel:
      strip.setPixelColor(i, strip.gamma32(strip.ColorHSV(pixelHue)));
    }
    strip.show(); // Update strip with new contents
    delay(wait);  // Pause for a moment
  }
}

// Rainbow-enhanced theater marquee. Pass delay time (in ms) between frames.
void theaterChaseRainbow(int wait) {
  int firstPixelHue = 0;     // First pixel starts at red (hue 0)
  for(int a=0; a<30; a++) {  // Repeat 30 times...
    for(int b=0; b<3; b++) { //  'b' counts from 0 to 2...
      strip.clear();         //   Set all pixels in RAM to 0 (off)
      // 'c' counts up from 'b' to end of strip in increments of 3...
      for(int c=b; c<strip.numPixels(); c += 3) {
        // hue of pixel 'c' is offset by an amount to make one full
        // revolution of the color wheel (range 65536) along the length
        // of the strip (strip.numPixels() steps):
        int      hue   = firstPixelHue + c * 65536L / strip.numPixels();
        uint32_t color = strip.gamma32(strip.ColorHSV(hue)); // hue -> RGB
        strip.setPixelColor(c, color); // Set pixel 'c' to value 'color'
      }
      strip.show();                // Update strip with new contents
      delay(wait);                 // Pause for a moment
      firstPixelHue += 65536 / 90; // One cycle of color wheel over 90 frames
    }
  }
}

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