Kaylan as Edna Mode

Introduction

Why this costume?
Although not the main character, Edna Mode is such an iconic and memorable character from The Incredibles animation saga. I really relate to her spunky attitude (have also been told many times how similar I am to her, personality and look-wise).

How was it to wear?
I didn’t take the weather into consideration when choosing this character but was grateful for this decision because her outfit is pretty covered up and I was able to add some warm layers to beef it up even more.

The LED pink neck piece was made out of felt so it was also very comfortable to wear.

Process

1. Neckpiece

Materials:
– 2 pieces of pink felt
– pattern designed on Illustrator
– hot glue gun
– velcro
– 2 6 LED bulbs strips
– battery
– Gemma
– pins
– wires
– soldering machine
– tubings
– wire tape

Cut out fabric from pattern
Fit test
Glue soldered circuit onto one side
Hot glue another piece of felt on top with a small opening for battery change.

2. Cigarette holder

Materials:
– 1 bamboo straw
– paints
– paintbrush
– 1 red light bulb
– 1 resistor
– battery pack
– AA batteries
– wires
– soldering machine
– tubings
– wire tape

painting the straw to look like a cigarette holder
Wire left long and wrapped in black tape to fit nicely into one’s palm

Circuits

// NeoPixel test program showing use of the WHITE channel for RGBW
// pixels only (won't look correct on regular RGB NeoPixel strips).

#include <Adafruit_NeoPixel.h>
#ifdef __AVR__
 #include <avr/power.h> // Required for 16 MHz Adafruit Trinket
#endif

// Which pin on the Arduino is connected to the NeoPixels?
// On a Trinket or Gemma we suggest changing this to 1:
#define LED_PIN     1

// How many NeoPixels are attached to the Arduino?
#define LED_COUNT  12

// NeoPixel brightness, 0 (min) to 255 (max)
#define BRIGHTNESS 70 // Set BRIGHTNESS to about 1/5 (max = 255)

// Declare our NeoPixel strip object:
Adafruit_NeoPixel strip(LED_COUNT, LED_PIN, NEO_GRBW + NEO_KHZ800);
// Argument 1 = Number of pixels in NeoPixel strip
// Argument 2 = Arduino pin number (most are valid)
// Argument 3 = Pixel type flags, add together as needed:
//   NEO_KHZ800  800 KHz bitstream (most NeoPixel products w/WS2812 LEDs)
//   NEO_KHZ400  400 KHz (classic 'v1' (not v2) FLORA pixels, WS2811 drivers)
//   NEO_GRB     Pixels are wired for GRB bitstream (most NeoPixel products)
//   NEO_RGB     Pixels are wired for RGB bitstream (v1 FLORA pixels, not v2)
//   NEO_RGBW    Pixels are wired for RGBW bitstream (NeoPixel RGBW products)

void setup() {
  // These lines are specifically to support the Adafruit Trinket 5V 16 MHz.
  // Any other board, you can remove this part (but no harm leaving it):
#if defined(__AVR_ATtiny85__) && (F_CPU == 16000000)
  clock_prescale_set(clock_div_1);
#endif
  // END of Trinket-specific code.

  strip.begin();           // INITIALIZE NeoPixel strip object (REQUIRED)
  strip.show();            // Turn OFF all pixels ASAP
  strip.setBrightness(BRIGHTNESS);
}

void loop() {
  // Fill along the length of the strip in various colors...
  //colorWipe(strip.Color(255,   0,   0)     , 50); // Red
  //colorWipe(strip.Color(  0, 255,   0)     , 50); // Green
  //colorWipe(strip.Color(  0,   0, 255)     , 50); // Blue
  //colorWipe(strip.Color(  0,   0,   0, 255), 50); // True white (not RGB white)

  //whiteOverRainbow(75, 5);

  pulseBlue(5);

  //rainbowFade2White(3, 3, 1);
}

// Fill strip pixels one after another with a color. Strip is NOT cleared
// first; anything there will be covered pixel by pixel. Pass in color
// (as a single 'packed' 32-bit value, which you can get by calling
// strip.Color(red, green, blue) as shown in the loop() function above),
// and a delay time (in milliseconds) between pixels.
void colorWipe(uint32_t color, int wait) {
  for(int i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) { // For each pixel in strip...
    strip.setPixelColor(i, color);         //  Set pixel's color (in RAM)
    strip.show();                          //  Update strip to match
    delay(wait);                           //  Pause for a moment
  }
}

void whiteOverRainbow(int whiteSpeed, int whiteLength) {

  if(whiteLength >= strip.numPixels()) whiteLength = strip.numPixels() - 1;

  int      head          = whiteLength - 1;
  int      tail          = 0;
  int      loops         = 3;
  int      loopNum       = 0;
  uint32_t lastTime      = millis();
  uint32_t firstPixelHue = 0;

  for(;;) { // Repeat forever (or until a 'break' or 'return')
    for(int i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) {  // For each pixel in strip...
      if(((i >= tail) && (i <= head)) ||      //  If between head & tail...
         ((tail > head) && ((i >= tail) || (i <= head)))) {
        strip.setPixelColor(i, strip.Color(0, 0, 0, 255)); // Set white
      } else {                                             // else set rainbow
        int pixelHue = firstPixelHue + (i * 65536L / strip.numPixels());
        strip.setPixelColor(i, strip.gamma32(strip.ColorHSV(pixelHue)));
      }
    }

    strip.show(); // Update strip with new contents
    // There's no delay here, it just runs full-tilt until the timer and
    // counter combination below runs out.

    firstPixelHue += 40; // Advance just a little along the color wheel

    if((millis() - lastTime) > whiteSpeed) { // Time to update head/tail?
      if(++head >= strip.numPixels()) {      // Advance head, wrap around
        head = 0;
        if(++loopNum >= loops) return;
      }
      if(++tail >= strip.numPixels()) {      // Advance tail, wrap around
        tail = 0;
      }
      lastTime = millis();                   // Save time of last movement
    }
  }
}

void pulseBlue(uint8_t wait) {
  for(int j=0; j<256; j++) { // Ramp up from 0 to 255
    // Fill entire strip with white at gamma-corrected brightness level 'j':
    strip.fill(strip.Color(j, 0, 0, 0));
    strip.show();
    delay(wait);
  }

  for(int j=255; j>=0; j--) { // Ramp down from 255 to 0
    strip.fill(strip.Color(j, 0, 0, 0));
    strip.show();
    delay(wait);
  }
}

void rainbowFade2White(int wait, int rainbowLoops, int whiteLoops) {
  int fadeVal=0, fadeMax=100;

  // Hue of first pixel runs 'rainbowLoops' complete loops through the color
  // wheel. Color wheel has a range of 65536 but it's OK if we roll over, so
  // just count from 0 to rainbowLoops*65536, using steps of 256 so we
  // advance around the wheel at a decent clip.
  for(uint32_t firstPixelHue = 0; firstPixelHue < rainbowLoops*65536;
    firstPixelHue += 256) {

    for(int i=0; i<strip.numPixels(); i++) { // For each pixel in strip...

      // Offset pixel hue by an amount to make one full revolution of the
      // color wheel (range of 65536) along the length of the strip
      // (strip.numPixels() steps):
      uint32_t pixelHue = firstPixelHue + (i * 65536L / strip.numPixels());

      // strip.ColorHSV() can take 1 or 3 arguments: a hue (0 to 65535) or
      // optionally add saturation and value (brightness) (each 0 to 255).
      // Here we're using just the three-argument variant, though the
      // second value (saturation) is a constant 255.
      strip.setPixelColor(i, strip.gamma32(strip.ColorHSV(pixelHue, 255,
        255 * fadeVal / fadeMax)));
    }

    strip.show();
    delay(wait);

    if(firstPixelHue < 65536) {                              // First loop,
      if(fadeVal < fadeMax) fadeVal++;                       // fade in
    } else if(firstPixelHue >= ((rainbowLoops-1) * 65536)) { // Last loop,
      if(fadeVal > 0) fadeVal--;                             // fade out
    } else {
      fadeVal = fadeMax; // Interim loop, make sure fade is at max
    }
  }

  for(int k=0; k<whiteLoops; k++) {
    for(int j=0; j<256; j++) { // Ramp up 0 to 255
      // Fill entire strip with white at gamma-corrected brightness level 'j':
      strip.fill(strip.Color(0, 0, 0, strip.gamma8(j)));
      strip.show();
    }
    delay(1000); // Pause 1 second
    for(int j=255; j>=0; j--) { // Ramp down 255 to 0
      strip.fill(strip.Color(0, 0, 0, strip.gamma8(j)));
      strip.show();
    }
  }

  delay(100); // Pause 1/2 second
}

Final Products

In the dark – at the parade

Learning

What I learned in the process

I was amazed by how many different skills were utilized for this project, from fashion design, prop design, soldering, to coding. Lots of creative problem solving.

Many things learned from working on the Plush Night Light project translate to this project as well. Like knowing which material to use, how to solder properly etc.

What I would do differently
– Take more process photos of the cigarette holder
– Use spray paint for a more polished look for the cigarette holder
– Experiment with more complex code for the neck piece’s animation