Astak IP-700 Surveillance Camera – Teardown

Hello! The MOLE is the all-in-one network camera for security and all your social network communities. A simple 3-step setup gets this Wi-Fi camera up and running so that you can automatically send video clips to YouTube, even if you’re not there. Sophisticated built-in motion detection controls what you record, and will notify you via Twitter or email if the Mole catches something.
You can remotely control the pan & tilt angles, and monitor or record video from anywhere in the world.

I was thrilled to break its parts down to see what this camera could see. For starters, an SD card came with !!

(unfortunately no footage on it)

This is the outer shelling of the camera as well as the body

Materials Used

  • Plastic: Many surveillance camera housings are made of durable plastic materials that are weather-resistant and lightweight.
  • Cables: Cables used in the camera may contain copper conductors for data and power transmission, surrounded by insulation materials.
  • Electronic Components: The internal components of the camera, such as the printed circuit board (PCB), image sensor, and other electronic parts, are typically made of various electronic materials, including semiconductors and conductive materials.
  • Rubber Seals : To make them weather-proof and moisture proof
  • Mounting Hardware: Mounting brackets and screws may be made of metal or sturdy plastic, (injection moulding)
  • Glass or Acrylic: The camera lens cover was made of glass or acrylic to protect the lens
  • Plastic or Rubber Grommets: These are used to seal cable entry points and prevent water ingress.

Manufacturing Techniques Used

  • Injection Molding
  • Metal Fabrication
  • Soldering and PCB Assembly
  • Lens Installation
  • Infrared (IR) LED Integration
  • Software/Firmware Installation

Tools used

  • Micro Screwdrivers
  • Regular Screwdrivers
  • Hammer
  • Chisel

Interesting Design elements

  • I was surprised to see not too many screws on the inside and multiple locking mechanisms to ensure there was no way water or dust could enter the camera. The build was super sturdy and pulling the two (Base & Camera) apart was definitely an issue.
  • The second thing that blew me away was the amount of tech and chips and dips in a product so small.
  • And the third is definitely have to be the Motorized Mechanisms (Pan, Tilt, Zoom) within the camera. Would love to learn a lot more!

Here’s a teardown video

đź“·đź’ĄNicon D3 Teardown

đź“„ The introduction of Nicon D3 camera

the reason that why I chose the camera is because I really into taking photographs by using film camera as well as SLR camera. different from the silver salt reaction, SLR camera utilized the CCD(Charge-coupled device) and the CMOS to record light informations so that we can take pictures much more easily and spread the photos more easily. So i’d like to figure out how those electronic componds are arranged in the camera body to achieve those powerful founctions.

🔧 The processes of assembly:

1 Remove all the screws that I can find

2 Use the heating gun to melt the rubber on the camera body.

3 Remove the screws under the rubbers.

4 Divide the camera into several parts.

5 Tear down the motherboard.

Here is the assembly process video đź”˝

⚙️ The main components of the camera:

✍️ my thoughts:

1 Nikon uses a lot of screws to connect different parts rather than using glue which makes the camera easy to take apart and easy to be repaired.

2 The body of the camera is made of magnesium which makes it as solid as a brick, all the parts are designed to use screws attach to it.

3 Robust surfaces, soft rubber on the grips, oversized buttons, locked controls, and environmental seals add up to a purposeful camera that has been designed with the requirements of the professional photographer in any situation.

Fading in and out of color

Hello,

I had a lot of fun with the RGB LED this week. Instead of using a pingpong ball to diffuse it I used a flexible plastic material and was able to film the subtle differences in color through my phone’s camera by placing the plastic directly on the lens of the camera. I played some Amadou & Mariam in the background for rhythm:

 

In the second exercise for this week it was hard to get super creative, but I was able to change the rate of fade. Here is a faster fade than the original with the delay at 5:

Thank you for visiting!

I’ll never let you down, little servo!

Hi, everybody!  So, I did my best to modify this code a little bit, but never really understood why I couldn’t control the function better. I’m pocketing this question for class. But, here’s what the sample code looks like:

[code]

#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;

int pos = 0;

void setup()
{
myservo.attach(9);
}

void loop()
{
for(pos = 0; pos <= 180; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 180; pos>=0; pos-=1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
}

[/code]

Here’s the closest thing to the way I had it in the end, when it still wasn’t functioning… I don’t have a video of that, because it really wasn’t any different with the exception of a little skip in the middle of the sweep.

[code]

#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;

int pos = 0;

void setup()
{
myservo.attach(9);

void loop()
{
for(pos = 0; pos <= 10; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(50);
}
for(pos = 10; pos <= 20; pos -= 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(50);
}
for(pos = 10; pos <= 20; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(50);
}
for(pos = 20; pos <= 30; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(50);
}
for(pos = 30; pos <= 40; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(50);
}
for(pos = 40; pos <= 50; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 50; pos <= 60; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 60; pos <= 70; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 70; pos >= 80; pos -= 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 80; pos <= 90; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 90; pos <= 100; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 100; pos <= 110; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 110; pos <= 120; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 120; pos <= 130; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 130; pos <= 140; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 140; pos <= 150; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}

for(pos = 150; pos <= 160; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 160; pos <= 170; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 170; pos <= 180; pos += 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
for(pos = 180; pos <= 0; pos -= 1)
{
myservo.write(pos);
delay(15);
}
}

[/code]

And here’s the video of the successful function, although I’m not happy that that’s all it does. I wanted it to function like an old yard sprinkler.

Thanks for looking!

Will

mr indecision

a small felt version of myself that turns its head and looks at you.

[Instructable here]

This is a project on using 123D Catch to get a 3D scan of my whole body. Once I had the scan I cleaned it up and manipulated it ready for 123D Make. I sliced the model in Make and preped it for Laser cutting. Once done I lazer cut and integrated the componentry and Arduino to make the head turn. I created two functions an automatic tracking function and a manually controlled function through Max MSP. In a way this is a Modern Day Puppet.

Code below the jump:
Continue reading “mr indecision”

Cloud

Advances in physical computing and interaction design hardware over recent years have created a new breed of smartobjects which are gaining more and more traction in the design world. These smartobjects have the potential to be far more interactive and emersive than ever before. What is exciting is that its becoming increasingly easier and cheaper to become a part of, with DIY and hacker communities initiatives such as Maker Faire, Instrutactables as well numerous other organisations & people showing the growing interest in this area. Done as part of the Making Studio Class taught by Becky Stern in the Products of Design Masters Program at School of Visual Arts. This project aims to capture the essence of this style of designing, where ideas, thinking and process are shared for others to use and expand on.

On one hand ‘Cloud’ is an Arduino controlled, motion triggered lightning & thunder performance. On the other it is a music activated visualizer & suspended speaker unit.

 

 

 

The cloud is made by felting hypoallergenic fiberfill to a sponge casing which forms the frame of the cloud and holds the speakers and componentry. The felting tool used is a custom made felting tool made from the left over sponge and 4 felting needles. To control the functions of the cloud there are three tactile switches scattered around the base. The concept references real clouds which constantly change shape through the switches requiring constant exploration to find the right switch to turn the right feature on or off.

Acting either as a semi-emersive lightning experience or as speaker with visual feedback this Nightlight – Nightspeaker hybrid introduces not only a new discourse for what a nightlight is or cloud be but also what a smartobject is or could be?

The Cloud

The Cloud

The Cloud

Arduino controlled motion triggered lightning & thunder and music activated EL wire diffuse flashes combined into a suspended speaker unit. The Cloud is a felted Nightlight – Nightspeaker hybrid, acting either as a semi-emersive lightning experience or a speaker. The controls of the cloud are tactile switches scattered around the base, similar real clouds which constantly change the switches are subtle and require constant exploration to find the right switch to turn the right feature on or off.

The Cloud

Work in progress, after days of working to get the separate components of the cloud working independently I now have them working together in the same arduino sketch. The components I am using are the the PIR sensor, the Wav Shield & LED Storm. My system does thus: The PIR sensor is triggered by motion > then the randomized Lightning sequence begins in a randomized cycle followed by a super lightning strike > milli seconds after the super lightning strike is a randomly selected thunder sound, the cloud then waits until the PIR is triggered again.

Lightning Cloud Test

Here is my code thus far: Continue reading “The Cloud”