Josh Corn – Garmin GPS Teardown

Garmin Nuvi 265 Teardown
IMG_4627

IMG_4629

Tools I used:

Small torx screwdriver
Small phillips head screwdriver
Plastic spackle knife
Needle nose pliers

To disassemble this GPS unit, I began by trying to pry the injection molded plastic unit apart along the seams around the edge. It seemed like there was something more keeping the halves attached so I started exploring. After a couple minutes, I peeled off the sticker on the rear bottom of the unit to find 2 tiny torx screws!

IMG_4632

IMG_4633

IMG_4634

After removing the screws, I pried apart the case using a plastic spackle knife.

IMG_4636

IMG_4637

IMG_4638

I disconnected both the cables between the two halves – one goes to the LCD display and the other connects the front LED.

IMG_4640

IMG_4642

IMG_4643

There were 3 more phillips head screws on the main circuit board so I removed them to pull out the board.

IMG_4645

IMG_4646

IMG_4647

I disconnected the cable attached to the speaker and the cable attached to the battery.

IMG_4648

I carefully popped out the LCD display from the front bezel and removed the surrounding foam.

IMG_4650

IMG_4649

IMG_4651

IMG_4652

The only other remaining parts to remove were the speaker and battery. I pulled the speaker off from the housing pretty easily but struggled with the battery as the adhesive was so strong it was pulling the battery apart. I decided to just leave it.

IMG_4658

IMG_4659

IMG_4660

IMG_4661

And here are all the parts removed!

IMG_4665

After finishing removing all the parts, I wanted to dig a bit further into the circuit board so I pried up the metal covering the GPS unit. It involved a lot of pulling with some pliers. Then GPS cover had a long rivet that was soldered through the board so I ended up having to force that apart with some force.

IMG_4654

IMG_4655

IMG_4666

I also removed the metal covering the logic portion of the board on the other side.

IMG_4667

IMG_4668

IMG_4671

Here are all the functions of the board that I could determine.

IMG_4669

IMG_4672

Overall the process wasn’t too difficult, once I first found the screws to open the unit. I thought that covering the screws with the sticker was an interesting design choice and certainly would deter some people from trying to do their own repairs on the unit. I also like the flexible circuits they used between the two halves of the unit, between the display and the main board. It makes sense to not have a rigid connection in order to easily repair the unit and allow for some relief.

SONY CLOCK RADIO TEARDOWN by Judy

1

2

3

REMOVED SCREWS TO EXPOSE INNER CIRCUIT BOARD

4

CIRCUIT BOARD, FOUND: (12) CAPACITOR, (8) BUTTON SWITCHES, (4) TOGGLE SWITCHES, (1) CERAMIC CAPACITOR, (1) SONY 1010S CHIP (COULD NOT FIND DATA SHEET)

5

INJECTION MOLDED SHELL

6

BACKSIDE PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD

7

REMOVING FM/AM DIAL

8

COOL TO SEE HOW THE PHYSICAL MECHANICS WORK- THIS BELT IS PART OF THE TUNING DIAL!

9

REMOVING BUTTONS… POP! POP!

10

11

12

13

14

TOP LEFT PART IS THE SNOOZE BUTTON (MY TRUSTY FRIEND THESE LAST 15 YEARS!)

15

TOP “CARCASS”

16

AM/FM TOGGLE SWITCH

17

18

Adam Fujita CIRC 06 exercise with SPEAKER FROM MY TEARDOWN!!!!!! YES!!!

OPEN SOURCE BABY!!!!  I used the speaker from our teardown assignment!!!!!!! That gets me super pump[ed up!!

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/106745793″>IMG 1189</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/storiesforpaloma”>Stories For Paloma</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Apple Speaker Teardown by Marianna Me-zhi-bov-ska-ya

1Apple speaker in closed and off position.

2Apple speaker twisted into the open position

3Injection molded accordion plastic tube ripped out of blue injection molded speaker frame.

https://vimeo.com/106429464  (Video of LED on.)

4Then I removed 4 small screws to release the printed circuit board and attached battery.

5Then I moved the blue injection molded switch to turn on the multi-colored LED.

6The back of the PCB includes an audio jack, a charge port, a toggle switch, a 10V 220μF capacitor

7Next I removed the speaker from the blue and metallic injection molded cap using an X-acto knife.

8SL 4 OHM 3 Watt speaker.

9The 3 tools I used to complete this teardown were the Leatherman Wave, Precision Screw Driver with phillips and flathead bit, and an X-acto knife.

The tape measure is just sexy!

The designed process that interested me most was the injection molded accordion tube. Its whiteness and the thickness of the flexible plastic filtered the brightness of the LED while remaining illuminating.

Xbox360 Controller Teardown (Oscar de la Hera Gomez)

Ladies and Gentlemen ! I present to you all the Xbox360 Controller Teardown video (presented below). The teardown involves taking apart a ‘Rock Candy’ Xbox360 controller and was conducted using a single *00 screwdriver from Home Depot. The Xbox360 Controller is encased in a two-part ABS plastic casing, formed via injection molding, which is held together via the means of seven Phillips screws. Additionally, all buttons (including their plastic covering), triggers, trigger mechanisms, D-pad and joysticks found on the controller are manufactured using injection molding.

The D-Pad is composed of a two part clip-in button, which is secured in between the casing and the logic board and informs the system via four strain gauges found on the logic board. Additionally, as demonstrated in the image below, the logic board contains four LED lights for the ‘Home’ button display and uses strain gauges to detect when the button that is pressed.

dPad-01
LEFT: Controller logic board showing joysticks and their button mechanism as well as button strain gauges. RIGHT: D-Pad mechanism.

Each Joysticks work via an analog stick system composed of a plastic joystick mounted on a double potentiometer system, which stacks them at right angles to each other. Depending on where the joystick points, each potentiometer will register a certain resistance, informing the logic board where the joystick is pointing and thus enabling user control. Additionally, this system includes a button mounted on the logic board, to allow the controller to register when the user presses the joystick in.

IMG_20140917_221412
Joystick Breakdown and Potentiometers’

The bumper buttons (RB and LB) are composed of a single, plastic piece that curves around the logic board and is held between the casing and two buttons. These buttons are mounted on the logic board and notify the controller when the bumpers are pressed.

IMG_20140916_231109
Bumper plastic and its buttons.

The triggers and trigger mechanisms are attached to the controller via a snap-fit mechanism and function in such a way that when the trigger is pressed is spins a receiver mounted on the logic board. This rotation sends a current to the logic board, which enables the user to accurately trigger the joystick and inform the system of how much they want this function to be active.

triggerMechanism-01
LEFT: Trigger mechanism on Logic Board. RIGHT: Trigger mechanism.

The controller rumble is caused by two DC motors attached to unbalanced weight, which in hand are attached to the logic board via cables.

IMG_20140916_231441
Unbalanced weights on DC Motors.

Finally, the logic board is connected to the console via a controller cable, which is attached to the logic board via a series of cables, which I believe are welded onto the controller.

IMG_20140916_231151
Logic board and its wiring.
vlcsnap-2014-09-17-21h32m27s115
Teardown Overview

O.

Disassembling the Digimon D-Terminal

“The D-Terminal is a palmtop computer used by the DigiDestined in Digimon Adventure 02. Although it is a normal item from the Real World, it has the ability to store multiple Digi-Eggs, allowing the DigiDestined to use multiple Armor evolutions”

-Digimon Wikia

As you can see, the D-Terminal is a serious piece of equipment, and the utmost caution was used in the disassembling of the device.

IMG_20140916_230736

IMG_20140916_230748

First the battery port was removed, revealing some very old, corroded batteries.

 IMG_20140916_230925

 Then the back plate screws were removed, giving us access to the internal components.

IMG_20140916_231323

Upon closer inspection we could see two 10μF capacitors, two 100Ω resistors, and an unlabeled crystal oscillator, which looks similar to those that are 32KHz. There are three small glass encased cylinders that I was also unable to identify to the left of the two capacitors above the resistors.

IMG_20140916_232549

Underneath all the buttons there were these circuits that were completed when pressed.

IMG_20140916_232835

Between the circuit and injection molded plastic there was a silicon nipple with a conductive material on the bottom to help complete said circuits.

IMG_20140917_211005

When you flip over the board you can detach the screen. Interestingly enough there were two strips of rubbery materials sandwiched between the exposed circuits. connecting the display to the circuit board.

IMG_20140916_232220

The body, buttons and trim were injection molded plastic. The screen was tempered glass and PCB’s made of copper laid over a non conductive substrate. The nipples that facilitated button pressing were molded silicone.

Looking back at my childhood memories, I expected this thing to be way more complicated inside but seeing as it was designed for children the simplicity of the circuit board and all it’s components make sense.

 IMG_20140916_232157

Something I noticed while dissembling the D-Terminal was how badly the eroding battery wrecked the circuit board. It has never been exposed to water and has been stored away safely with other electronics for years.

Teardown by Jonathan Lung